Exciting news for Information Studies students!

We’ve been subscribing to a great resource affectionately known as ‘LISA’ for many years. This resource has been invaluable to Information Studies students and staff for many years.
LISA (Library & Information Science Abstracts) helps to focus searching for international scholarly literature on library and information science. However, as suggested by the name it is an abstract service only.
We are really pleased to announce that we now have access to the ‘Library & Information Science Collection”. This new collection now searches our much loved LISA, as well as the Library Science Full Text Database.
In summary we now have over 300 full text journal titles included when you search the ‘Library & Information Science Collection’.

Information Studies LibGuide

LISA database screenshot

From Resources to referencing

A book and notepadAssignments: from Resources to Referencing has been prepared by the Subject Librarians at the University to develop key information literacy skills essential for academic study – from finding high quality academic materials to citing resources correctly in your assignments. The module is available to all students on Blackboard.

The module currently contains three sections:

Library and IT Induction
• Provides everything you need to know about getting started with library services and collections.
• A quiz to practice using library resources.

Referencing and Plagiarism Awareness
• Helps you understand the importance of accurate referencing; how to create accurate citations and references; how to manage your citations using referencing software tools and how to interpret your Turnitin Similarity Report.
• This guide includes a quiz which allows you to practice the skills you have learned using the specific referencing style specified by your department

News & Media Literacy
• This guide helps develop critical skills in evaluating the information we consume online. You will learn how to define key concepts such as free speech, misinformation, disinformation and censorship; understand concepts of selection and bias in the media and how to spot fake news.
• This guide includes a quiz which allows you to test the knowledge you have gained.

Further guides and quizzes will be added to the module in future.
If you require guidance in using the module, have any questions on using library collections and services or have any feedback, please contact: librarians@aber.ac.uk / 01970 621896

BBC Historic Archive now available through Box of Broadcasts.

An old-time television setIf you are anything like me then you are probably rejoicing in the fact that the BBC’s archive of historic radio and television programmes is being made available through Box of Broadcasts.

I for one can’t wait to watch post-apocalyptic fun-fest Z for Zachariah (broadcast in 1984 as part of the Play for Today strand). If that’s not your thing, how about Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs talking about Jack Kerouac on Arena in 1988 ? Not for you? Then maybe an episode of Horizon from 1980 exploring how voice-controlled word processors are set to revolutionise the office). Or how about a personal tour of Stratford upon Avon in the company of Welsh playwright Huw Lloyd Edwards in Arall Fyd from 1972?

Of course this is the BBC so there is so much more: cultural highlights (BBC Television Shakespeare); landmark light entertainment (Multi-Coloured Swap Shop – that’s my childhood, right there!) There are flagship news shows (Newsnight) and historic accounts of landmark social and cultural events (Yesterday’s Witness). It all adds up to a resource of unparalleled quality and depth.

Box of Broadcasts have put together some useful information on how to access the historic content in the archive, but if you get stuck with anything please don’t hesitate to contact your subject librarian for help.

Here are some other useful links for finding your way around Box of Broadcasts:

Here are some useful links for teaching staff:

We wish you an enjoyable Christmas break!

We are so lucky here in Aberystwyth with lovely rolling hills and great walks. It seemed fitting for our last team meeting of the year to escape the screens and get together outside before the Christmas break with a team walk and coffee catch up at Nant yr Arian.

This term has been busy and has passed really quickly! It’s been a great mix with online as well as face to face teaching sessions and providing support. We’ve loved being back on the Hugh Owen Level F enquiry desk, helping with many varied questions and queries.

We are here until the Thursday 23rd December, if you need any help contact us at librarians@aber.ac.uk After the break we’ll be back on the Tuesday 4th January.

There will be some computer rooms and study spaces available over the Christmas break, more details can be found here: News Item : Information Services , Aberystwyth University.

We would like to wish everyone a lovely break and look forward to helping and supporting you in 2022!

(From left to right; Joy Cadwallader, Abi Crook, Sioned Llywelyn, Lloyd Roderick, Anita Saycell, Sarah Gwenlan)

New Dissertation and News and Media LibGuides

Our Subject Librarians have published not one but two new LibGuides to help you with your studies and what comes after.

Dissertation LibGuide

Whether you’re planning ahead for your dissertation or part way through it and regretting every decision you’ve made, this guide can help you!

In one easy-to-follow and simple guide, you will find all you need to understand and manage the dissertation process from finding information sources and developing your searching techniques to evaluating and referencing the sources you use.

For help and advice for every stage of your dissertation, from concept to conclusion, take a look our our Dissertation LibGuidehttps://libguides.aber.ac.uk/dissertation.

Screenshot from the News and Media LibGuide

News and Media LibGuide

Our News and Media guide is a clear and comprehensive resource to help you navigate the tricky world of news and media throughout your time at University and beyond.

  • Protect your image online
  • Define key concepts such as free speech, misinformation, disinformation and censorship
  • Learn how algorithms are used to target people on social media platforms
  • Understand concepts of selection and bias
  • Explain what fake news is and how to recognise it

Our News and Media LibGuide is here to help you help yourself stay safe and savvy: https://libguides.aber.ac.uk/newsandmedia  

See all of our subject and study support LibGuides here

Get to know your librarians

Subject Librarians provide information skills training, look after your reading lists and subject guides and offer support and advice on using the libraries, finding resources for your assignments and referencing. Aberystwyth University Libraries has 7 Subject Librarians, each with their own areas of expertise.  

You are very welcome to arrange a MS Teams meeting with your Subject Librarian if you have any questions about using the Library or would like advice – you can do this online here, or by e-mail. Or just drop them a message to say hello!  

Joy Cadwallader jrc Joy Cadwallader – jrc@aber.ac.uk  

Joy is the Subject Librarian for Theatre, Film and Television Studies, Modern Languages and English and Creative Writing.  

I’ve just completed a PG diploma in managing information and library services and have begun learning Welsh, better late than never! Before Covid I enjoyed ballroom & Latin dancing, travelling and karaoke. Nowadays I love visiting local wildlife projects that have re-opened and watching professional road cycling on TV. 

Simon French sif4 Simon French – sif4@aber.ac.uk 

Computer ScienceGeography and Earth SciencesInternational Politics, Maths and Physics are Simon’s areas of expertise.  

As a child, I was a keen reader and collector of books. As an adult, I worked for many, many unhappy years in the second-hand and rare book trade before becoming a librarian here at Aberystwyth University. All of this might lead you to think that I’m a bit of a one-trick-pony, but I want to make it abundantly clear that I do enjoy things other than books, like…um…! 

Anita Saycell aiv Anita Saycell – aiv@aber.ac.uk 

Anita looks after Business, Sport and Exercise Science and Information Studies.

I started volunteering in libraries at the age of 14, then secured my first paid Saturday library job at 16 and everything has come from there.  When I’m not out cycling on the rolling Ceredigion hills, I really enjoy teaching and being able to help, so please do get in touch with any question however big or small! 

Sarah Gwenlan ssg Sarah Gwenlan – ssg@aber.ac.uk  

Sarah is our Subject Librarian for Education, the International English Centre and Psychology

Prior to working at Aberystwyth University I taught English Language in Spain, the Czech Republic, Italy and Poland. I’ve also worked in the Careers Services at SOAS and Newport, so you could say I’m familiar with working with students! Please get in touch if you need help, that’s why I’m here!

Lloyd Roderick glr9 Lloyd Roderick – glr9@aber.ac.uk  

Lloyd is responsible for Art and Art History, Law and Criminology, Welsh and Celtic Studies and History and Welsh History 

I wanted to work in libraries after spending a lot of time hanging around the music collection in Llanelli public library after realising they had Sonic Youth’s back catalogue available to loan. After university I worked at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Library, University of London, then studied an MSc in Information and Library Science.  I later worked at Newport public libraries and the Courtauld Institute of Art library.  Later I produced a PhD studying art collections at the National Library of Wales…. all of which has given me a good background for supporting students and staff in the departments I work with as a Subject Librarian at Aberystwyth University. 

In my spare time I’m an assessor on the Professional Registration Panel of CILIP (Chartered Institute of Librarians and Information Professionals) and have curated exhibitions on modernism and contemporary art in Wales.  

Non Jones nrb Non Jones – nrb@aber.ac.uk 

Non’s subject areas are Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences and BVSc Veterinary Science

Ever since I got work experience at my local public library here in Aberystwyth when I was a pupil in secondary school (… and I’m going back several years now!), I knew I wanted to be a librarian.  I joined Information Services in 2001 and a few years later received a postgraduate degree in Information and Library Studies here at the University as a distance learner.  In my spare time – in between looking after the family, cats, chickens and hamsters – I enjoy reading and being creative with art, craft and calligraphy.

Connie Davage hod Connie Davage – hod@aber.ac.uk    

Connie looks after Lifelong Learning.  

I liked to help my colleague in the school library where I taught in Shanghai. I guess that is where my librarian journey started. I enjoy travelling, gardening and baking. Most of all, I enjoy being able to help people, so please get in touch if you have any questions.  

Black History Month 2021

Black History Month is an annual event reflecting on the histories and cultures of black people throughout the world. It began in America but has been marked every October in the UK since 1987.

For Black History Month 2021, Aberystwyth University Library has published a new list of recommended reading and resources which offer the opportunity to explore some perhaps lesser-known facets of Black History:

  

Welsh Black History

Our Black History in Wales selections take us on journeys to explore Wales’ involvement in slavery and its pivotal role in abolishing it (Slave Wales by Chris Evans);  personal journeys of self-discovery and mixed-race identity (Sugar and Slate by Charlotte Williams) and onto the first Welsh-language volume to discuss the portrayal of multiculturalism in Wales in contemporary Welsh and English fiction (Y Gymru Ddu ar Ddalen Wen by Lisa Sheppard).

 

British Black History

In this section, we look at the experiences of women and students of colour in British Academia (Inside the ivory tower edited by Deborah Gabriel and Shirley Tate and Insider-Outsider: The Role of Race in Shaping the Experiences of Black and Minority Ethnic Students by Sofia Akel). We see how the cultural impact of the politics of race and antiracism is reflected in Black British and British Asian literature (Race and antiracism in Black British and British Asian literature by Dave Gunning), and follow both a historical narrative of Britain’s racialized minorities (Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain, Peter Fryer) and a very British crisis of identity (Afua Hirsch’s Brit(ish): on race, identity and belonging). 

 

Black History in Poetry 

Experience Black History in poetry through recent works by the Dylan Thomas Prize winning Kayombo Chingonyi (Kumukanda) and Raymond Antrobus’ debut collection The Perseverance. Delve into the astonishing online Proquest Literature One African American Poetry collection of nearly 3,000 poems by African American poets of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.   

 

Fiction and Non-Fiction

Our fiction recommendations for you include recently published novels, the Welsh-language novel Safana by Jerry Hunter and Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams, prize-winning novels (An American Marriage by Tayari Jones; Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo), classic novels (Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Beloved by Toni Morrison and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man) and popular YA fiction (Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi and Angie Thomas’ The Hate U Give )

In our non-fiction selection you’ll find autobiographies and biographies of influential black people (Becoming, Michelle Obama) and a diverse range of challenging essays and political and social commentaries (I will not be erased, gal-dem; Slay in your lane: the Black girl bible, Yomi Adegoke; Natives, Akala; Don’t touch my hair, Emma Dabiri).

 

Online Resources

The list contains many wonderful online resources, but do not overlook the Proquest One Literature Black Writing and World Literature Collection which brings together the largest and most inclusive literature collection ever curated. These are the special projects we are highlighting this month:

African Writers Series​ 

This online collection includes over 250 volumes of fiction, poetry, drama and non-fictional prose by African authors.

Caribbean Literature​ 

More than a million-and-a-half Africans, along with many Indians and South Asians, were brought to the Caribbean between the 15th and 19th centuries. Today, their descendants are producing literature with strong and direct ties to traditional African expressions.

Black Women Writers​ 

Black Women Writers presents 100,000 pages of literature and essays on feminist issues – from 18th century narratives depicting slavery, to works by a wide range of authors during the late 1950s and 1960s, following the winds of independence that swept across Africa.

Black Short Fiction and Folklore​ 

Black Short Fiction and Folklore brings together 82,000 pages and more than 11,000 works of short fiction, comprising a variety of traditions ranging from early African oral traditions to hip-hop – including fables, parables, ballads, folk-tales, short stories and novellas.  

Black History Month display on Level F Hugh Owen Library

We have included a range of physical and online resources on the list, so whether you’re on campus or off, you’ll find something interesting to read. Browse our virtual display here or if you prefer to browse in person, we will have a display on Level F of the Hugh Owen Library throughout October.

And please let us know what you think of the selection! Tweet using the hashtag #BHMAber21 or @aberuni_is on Twitter. 

Is Aberystwyth’s Future Under Water? Stemming the tide of Climate Change.

Climate Change is a daunting subject to get to grips with and finding reliable information to help understand this most critical topic can feel overwhelming. Tackling Climate Change is the responsibility of everyone, and whether your background is in the arts, or in politics, or in the social, environmental or physical sciences, it is vital that each and every one of us does what we can to understand the impact of Climate Change on our world.

The ‘Is Aberystwyth’s Future Under Water? Stemming the tide of Climate Change reading list was created by Catherine Fletcher and Annabel Cook while on an AberForward placement for the Library Academic Engagement Team. This collection of resources was initially put together to support the outcomes of the upcoming AU Festival of Research (18 – 25 October 2021) but we thought it might also be useful to a wider audience. The list seeks to provide a range of information on Climate Change both locally and globally. It includes a link to an interactive map which allows you to explore sea level rise and coastal flood threats that might affect where you live. (Be warned: it’s properly terrifying!)

(Pictured above Climate Central Interactive Map showing the land projected to be below annual flood level in Aberystwyth and surrounding areas in 2040)

We know how much students and residents cherish Aberystwyth so hopefully by shining a light on the negative impact that Climate Change may have on the town, it will help us, as a community, to strive towards making more sustainable choices.

It is not just the Aberystwyth area that the resources on this list focus on. The selection of scientific articles that we have chosen outline the effects of the climatic changes which may have an impact across the globe. We also wanted to show that the research is interdisciplinary, highlighting the vital role all scientific departments throughout the university play in investigating Climate Change. The hope is that in fully understanding Climate Change, we can more efficiently predict and adapt to the challenges we are inevitably going to face.

(Pictured above photograph in Anthropocene poetics: deep time, sacrifice zones, and extinction by David Farrier – 2019)

It is important to remember that it is not only the scientific departments who can inspire change. The arts and social sciences have a role in providing a more creative angle to thinking about and understanding Climate Change. This reading list aims to show how those disciplines are already reacting to the threat that the climate crisis poses.

We all need to do our bit. So whether it’s studying art or studying zoology (or any subject in between) we need to bring our expertise, and our inspiration, to the great crisis of our time. Do let us know what you think of the list, it is a living document and if there are resources that you think should be there, let us know and we will add them.

New Copyright LibGuide

As a student, do you want to know how copyright affects how you might prepare for and write your assignments? Perhaps you are a lecturer, and you want to know if showing a film or television programme during a lecture or seminar might be breaching copyright legislation? Or are you a researcher looking to protect your own work from being used by others without your permission?
Answers to these and many other questions about copyright are dealt with in our new Copyright LibGuide. The LibGuide offers not just a comprehensive overview of the current copyright legislation but also practical advice on common copyright scenarios that you might encounter as part of your work here at Aberystwyth University.
The LibGuide is available in Welsh and in English.


(Engraving by William Hogarth. In the Public Domain)

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New! Employability LibGuide

Our library services are not just here to help you get your degree. They can also help you get the job you want after you graduate! 

Students practising presentations

Aberystwyth University Subject Librarians have prepared a new Employability LibGuide. This is your guide to the books and resources that can help you write a winning CV, and to specialist advice and tools to help you Research the company or organisation you want to work for

You can use the guide to:

  • Find Resources on different companies, Industries and general careers advice 
  • Discover tools for developing essential digital and information skills to enhance your graduate prospects 
  • Research your chosen career path and prepare for job applications and interviews 

The library’s resources can help you secure the job of your dreams as you develop your employability.

Take a look at the guide here: https://libguides.aber.ac.uk/employability